Bali: Lessons on Religion & New Friendships
Travel

Bali: Lessons on Religion & New Friendships

On the edge of a vivid green rice field awash with the first rays of sunlight, a farmer offers a slice of his breakfast to God. He smiles as he arranges banana slices, bright yellow marigold petals, frangipani, a few grains of rice and a burning incense stick on a small tray made of palm fronds. As the fragrant smoke drifts along the slope, he prays for a rich harvest.

Followed by a rhythmic sweeping of brooms to clean dwellings, the day is set into motion with gratefulness to God for driving away demonic spirits and a smile as bright as the day.

Welcome to Bali, a province where respect runs high, friendships are made easy and God is one.

Paddy field
Paddy field

 

This offering is also known as Canang Sari
This offering is also known as Canang Sari

Of 17400+ islands in Indonesia, Bali is the only Hindu island standing strong in a nation dominated by Muslims. So, every time you meet a local, s/he would ask you three questions (if you are an Indian):

1. What’s your name?

2. Are you from India?

3. Are you Hindu?

Religion plays a major role in so much of what makes Bali appealing to visitors: the art, architecture, temples, offerings, music, culture and more. This distinctive culture is worn like a badge of honour by its people.

There are temples in every house, village and office, on beaches and mountains, in rice fields, caves, cemeteries, lakes, rivers and even the sea. These temples are made of jet black stones which, Kadek (our guide) explained, is solidified magma collected from the foot of the volcanoes.

A Bali temple
A Bali temple

At Bali’s soul, dwells its belief in one Supreme God – Sang Hyang Widhi. Sang Hyang Widhi is the Trimurti manifestation of – Brahma (the creator), Wishnu (the preserver) and Shiva (the destroyer).

Trimurti
Trimurti

There are various other Gods that Balinese people worship too – Ganesh, Ghatotkach, Saraswati, Durga etc.

Ganesh inside Goa Gajah
Ganesh inside Goa Gajah

 

Ram Setu Bandhan
Ram Setu Bandhan

 

Ghatotkach
Ghatotkach

 

Wishnu astrid Garuda, set to be the tallest statue
Wishnu astride Garuda, set to be the tallest statue

 

Statues near Uluwatu temple
Statues near Uluwatu temple

Kadek had a very beautiful explanation for this. He addressed Tathagata and said, “TG, you have a lot of definitions – a tourist, a husband, a son etc. Just like that, Sang Hyang Widhi is Brahma, Wishnu and Shiva. The destination is the same – one God. And you will reach there no matter where you go from – left, right, down, up. Now which way to take to God is up to you.”

Goa Gajah - the Elephant CaveGoa Gajah – the Elephant Cave. Everyone is required to wear a sarong in the temple premises

The holy water spring at Goa Gajah
The holy water spring at Goa Gajah

 

The Holy tree at Goa Gajah
The Holy tree at Goa Gajah

 

The origins of this stone and even the cave is uncertain. No one knows how these stones were formed/laid here
The origin of these stones and even the cave is uncertain. No one knows how these stones were formed/laid here.

 

We're still at Goa Gajah
We’re still at Goa Gajah

Kadek added, “If you look at God as different entities, then you will have to follow different rules to worship each. This difference creates conflict. Now if we fight amongst ourselves, other religions will find it easy to attack and break us. Why will we let that happen?”

Uluwatu temple
Uluwatu temple

 

The Uluwatu temple campus is huge
The Uluwatu temple campus is huge and overlooks the sea

 

At Uluwatu
At Uluwatu

 

The waves breaking at the cliff base at Uluwatu temple
The waves breaking at the cliff base at Uluwatu temple

What struck me most is how religion has played a vital role in the open-minded nature of Balinese people. They are highly flexible in their offerings to God and would even offer a cigarette if that is what they are thankful to God for. “God will accept anything if you are serious.”

Tanah Lot, said to be the foundation of Bali
Tanah Lot, said to be the foundation of Bali

 

Tanah Lot. Tourists are not allowed inside any temple in Bali
The beauty of Tanah Lot is that it’s surrounded by the sea – Nature is its protector

Their open-minded beliefs have made them highly tolerant and hospitable towards other cultures. But they rarely travel themselves – such is the importance of their village and family ties (not to mention the cost).

The people in Bali are unfailingly friendly and love a chat. Add that to Tathagata’s extremely social nature and you get a brewing pot of friendships in an island 5000 miles away from home.

Leonardo, a Balinese surfer on the Kuta beach, who rents out beach recliners by the hour, calls Tathagata “My man TG”.

Kadek has added Tathagata on Facebook and I’ve heard they chat on and off. We also befriended our driver, Aagus. Kadek refers to him as “Aagus, my handsome man” with a laugh. Apparently, ‘aagus’ means ‘handsome’ in Balinese language.

Kadek and Aagus
Tathagata is flanked by Kadek on his left and Aagus on his right, Kadek is wearing a traditional Balinese costume

Apart from Aagus and Sang Hyang Widhi, Kadek also introduced us to Bali’s popular penjor.

Come Galungan Day and Bali decks up in penjor, a symbol of the bounty of the earth and an expression of thankfulness for all that is good in Nature. It is a tall, curved bamboo pole decorated with coconut leaves and colourful cloth. At the base, sits a small bamboo shrine where the offerings are placed. Asked about the curve at the tip, Kadek said, “The length symbolizes our desire to aim high, but the bend signifies that we are humble to the Earth that provides us food and shelter.”

See the Penjor?
Do you see the Penjor?

It’s beautiful how nature is worshipped as the ultimate power in Bali. The omnipresence of this belief is tremendous. And the grateful nature of people is what makes them so amiable and the island heavenly.

Here's another one
Here’s another Penjor, they are everywhere, along the road, inside temples, outside homes

On Day 1 of our Bali trip, we were lucky enough to get into a Bluebird taxi being driven by Hari. His name surprised us and we later learned that much of Bali’s dialect is derived from Sanskrit, giving a lot of their words a resemblance to ours. Hence, ‘Hari’ is a common name in Bali.

As it turned out, we couldn’t have met a better guide and friend than him. The places he took us to are hidden gems that I’ve stored for another day.

Hari deserves a special mention here because of the gentleman that he is. He was always 5 minutes early at the hotel, waiting patiently in his car for us to finish our breakfast and hop on. He took us through a culture immersion of Bali with an equal interest in learning about ours as we were in his. And he never failed to pronounce ‘Diwali’ as ‘Dilwali’! God bless that man.

Hari was happy to show us the authentic Bali we would've missed otherwise
Hari was happy to show us the authentic Bali we would’ve missed otherwise

We also befriended 4 smiling faces at Warung Mina, a restaurant near our hotel. I couldn’t pronounce their names but they were happy to see us every day and were sad to see us go.

Friends at Warung Mina, Kuta
Friends at Warung Mina, Kuta

Check out the bartender’s liquor bottle juggling skills. He was happy to perform for us with a twinkle in his eyes.

After meeting the people in Bali, I realized that they have a willingness to share and explain different aspects of their religion to outsiders, inviting us to see for ourselves what Bali stands for. And you would be amazed at how every detail they share enhances the beauty of the landscapes around you.

Sunset
The sun sets on our way back to the hotel

As the sun tips back towards the mountains, you would be able to feel the peace and balance that the Gods have blessed this island with. A deep sense of gratitude would engulf you as you watch the calmness of the hills descend around you with the dying sun. Close your eyes and feel it. You would come to realize that the paradise that people say Bali is, resides within you. Welcome!

More on Bali here: Bali: Hidden Gems

Ronita

I love lazy mornings, tea, the smell of old books and oxblood staircases. I can eat red velvet cake (with cream cheese frosting) all day. Over time, I’ve realized that there’s more to Red Velvet than just cake.

12 Comments

  • Sarah

    It looks like you had a great time in Bali. Isn’t it a lovely place? Wasn’t keen on Kuta but loved the people, the temples. Oh, I want to go back now 🙂

    • Ronita

      Ronita

      Thank you B! It was a heavenly trip that I’m so grateful to have been on. Bali has left a lasting impression in my heart and I hope I can go back again one day. I’m sure you’ll love Bali too.

    • Ronita

      Ronita

      Bali has been truly memorable for me and I hold this place close to my heart. You can plan a short trip there since you live nearby. I’m sure you are going to love this place too!

  • Fairuz

    Balinese culture and belief system is fascinating. It’s interesting to learn about the Supreme Sang Hyang Widhi, particularly its manifestation of Brahma, Wishnu and Shiva. I’ve been to Bali a coupld of times but yet to visit Goa Gajah. I wonder if the holy water spring there can bring good luck.

    • Ronita

      Ronita

      The entrance to the cave is an archeological marvel! The pull of this place lies in the fact that its origin is mysterious. As you enter the dark cave, you would be able to feel the energy inside it. Make it a point to visit Goa Gajah next time you’re in Bali. And don’t forget to drink the coconut water sold on the premises. There’s probably a litre of water inside those orange shells and it tastes surprisingly sweet!

    • Ronita

      Ronita

      There’s way more to any destination than what meets the eye. And religion is everywhere regardless of whether it’s an island or a concrete jungle. Some have temples, some have mosques, some have churches and so on. No surprise there. Thanks for dropping by, Nitin.

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